Untitled
brucesterling:

http://blog.longnow.org/02014/09/29/science-fiction-authors-manual-for-civilization/

The Manual for Civilization is a crowd-curated collection of the 3500 books you would most want to sustain or rebuild civilization. It is also the library at The Interval, with about 1000 books on shelves floor-to-ceiling throughout the space. We are about a third of the way done with compiling the list and acquiring selected the titles.
We have a set of four categories to guide selections:
Cultural Canon: Great works of literature, nonfiction, poetry, philosophy, etc
Mechanics of Civilization: Technical knowledge, to build and understand things
Rigorous Science Fiction: Speculative stories about potential futures
Long-term Thinking, Futurism, and relevant history (Books on how to think about the future that may include surveys of the past)
Our list comes from suggestions by Interval donors, Long Now members, and a some specially-invited guests with particular expertise. All the book lists we’ve published so far are shown here including lists from Brian Eno, Stewart Brand, Maria Popova, andNeal Stephenson. Interval donors will be the first to get the full list when it is complete.
Today we add selections from science fiction authors Bruce Sterling, David Brin, and Daniel Suarez. All three are known for using contemporary science and technology as a starting point from which to speculate on the future. And that type of practice is exactly why Science Fiction is one of our core categories….

brucesterling:

http://blog.longnow.org/02014/09/29/science-fiction-authors-manual-for-civilization/

The Manual for Civilization is a crowd-curated collection of the 3500 books you would most want to sustain or rebuild civilization. It is also the library at The Interval, with about 1000 books on shelves floor-to-ceiling throughout the space. We are about a third of the way done with compiling the list and acquiring selected the titles.

We have a set of four categories to guide selections:

  • Cultural Canon: Great works of literature, nonfiction, poetry, philosophy, etc
  • Mechanics of Civilization: Technical knowledge, to build and understand things
  • Rigorous Science Fiction: Speculative stories about potential futures
  • Long-term Thinking, Futurism, and relevant history (Books on how to think about the future that may include surveys of the past)

Our list comes from suggestions by Interval donors, Long Now members, and a some specially-invited guests with particular expertise. All the book lists we’ve published so far are shown here including lists from Brian EnoStewart BrandMaria Popova, andNeal Stephenson. Interval donors will be the first to get the full list when it is complete.

Today we add selections from science fiction authors Bruce SterlingDavid Brin, and Daniel Suarez. All three are known for using contemporary science and technology as a starting point from which to speculate on the future. And that type of practice is exactly why Science Fiction is one of our core categories….

I need some socks like this.

dude god could come down from heaven with a million angels and tell me that gif is pronounced “jif” and i still wouldn’t fucking do it

flatbear:

IT”S NOT A PHASE FRANK PARKOUR IS MY LIFE NOW.

fuckyeahblackwidow:


Crossbones: Shoot her!

One of the things I love about Natasha having her own series is she can actually beat the bad guy every now and again. Natasha has an established aura of competence that sometimes, paradoxically, means writers bring her in to establish the competence of their characters. Natasha gets knocked out in three panels to set up a fight between Daredevil and Echo, gets captured by HAMMER to facilitate hero moments for Pepper Potts and Maria Hill, and though she bailed Bucky out constantly, fifty issues of Captain America appearances never saw her defeat anyone more notable than faceless AIM mooks.
Because Natasha is so omnipresent, I think there’s been this assumption that these showings get balanced out by the foes she defeats on the regular. Captain America, Iron Man, and Thor get dragged into a lot of cameos, too, and not all of them are flattering. But Natasha doesn’t have her own demons to fight, every month. Or, she didn’t. So seeing her beating Crossbones almost as an afterthought was pretty nifty.
From Black Widow #9, by Nathan Edmondson and Phil Noto.

fuckyeahblackwidow:

Crossbones: Shoot her!

One of the things I love about Natasha having her own series is she can actually beat the bad guy every now and again. Natasha has an established aura of competence that sometimes, paradoxically, means writers bring her in to establish the competence of their characters. Natasha gets knocked out in three panels to set up a fight between Daredevil and Echo, gets captured by HAMMER to facilitate hero moments for Pepper Potts and Maria Hill, and though she bailed Bucky out constantly, fifty issues of Captain America appearances never saw her defeat anyone more notable than faceless AIM mooks.

Because Natasha is so omnipresent, I think there’s been this assumption that these showings get balanced out by the foes she defeats on the regular. Captain America, Iron Man, and Thor get dragged into a lot of cameos, too, and not all of them are flattering. But Natasha doesn’t have her own demons to fight, every month. Or, she didn’t. So seeing her beating Crossbones almost as an afterthought was pretty nifty.

From Black Widow #9, by Nathan Edmondson and Phil Noto.

sturmtruppen:

this is some anime bullshit

tonymoore:

#deadpool #sketch from #rosecity #comicon #commission #sketchcover #dp

tonymoore:

#deadpool #sketch from #rosecity #comicon #commission #sketchcover #dp

brianmichaelbendis:

MOEBIUS DOES MARVEL

Fruit loops ain’t playing when it comes to the toys in the cereal box. W

Fruit loops ain’t playing when it comes to the toys in the cereal box.
W